At any time the Torbay Catchment Group is involved in a number of projects, funded through various organisations. Most projects are aimed at improving farming practices and/or biodiversity protection and enhancement. Projects can vary greatly, depending on funding availability, and landholder and partner involvement. Some examples of projects undertaken by the group include an artificial wetland to strip nutrients from farm run-off, establishment of riparian vegetation along creeklines, direct seeding trials, construction of a multi-use trail, shorebird surveys and upgrading a wildlife corridor. More details are available below and on the completed projects page.

Most projects require field work – planting trees, erecting signs, collecting seed, sampling waterways and much more. We are always looking for volunteers to help with these tasks, so if you would like to help, check out the events page for information on any upcoming field work.

Our current projects are:

Fox Control in the Greater Torbay Catchment (commenced May 2013)

This project will control feral animals, especially the introduced red fox, by contracting professional feral animal controllers to trap and dispatch no fewer than 50 foxes or cats per year, for the next three years within the Greater Torbay Catchment. The contractor will be required to provide evidence of captures (ears).

Organised shooting events are not viable within the greater Torbay Catchment due to predominately smaller sized properties. 1080 baiting programs widely advertised in previous years have not been taken up by landholders. Therefore contracting a professional feral animal controller, who holds the appropriate firearm licences and insurances, is proposed. The professional feral animal controllers will target known problems areas such as refuse sites and reserves working closely with private landholders, City of Albany, Verve Energy, the Department of Parks and Wildlife, Department of Water and Water Corporation to implement trapping and accepted control methods. Funded by South Coast Natural Resource Management.

More information is available for any people interested in undertaking fox control on their own properties.

 

Protecting South Coast ecosystems (commenced August 2013)

Recovery, threat abatement and connectivity actions for EPBC listed Species: Ring-tailed Possums

Improving connectivity and condition of corridor remnant vegetation will address fragmentation to allow improved prospects for animal movement. Revegetating key areas for Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation species will improve habitat and prevent further fragmentation of remnant vegetation. This investment involves private landholders implementing strategic actions to manage threats, and improve habitat for the western ring tailed possum. More information is available on the possums page. Funded by South Coast Natural Resource Management.

 

Protecting South Coast ecosystems (commenced August 2013)

Recovery, threat abatement and connectivity actions for EPBC listed Species: Black Cockatoos

Improving connectivity and condition of corridor remnant vegetation will address fragmentation to allow improved prospects for animal movement. Revegetating key areas for Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation species will improve habitat and prevent further fragmentation of remnant vegetation. This investment involves private landholders implementing strategic actions to manage threats, and improve habitat and nesting opportunities for Carnabys, Baudins and Red Tailed Black cockatoos. A flyer to introduce the cockatoo conservation project is available for download (1Mb PDF) and more information is available from the cockatoos page. Funded by South Coast Natural Resource Management.

 

Southern Soils (commenced August 2013)

Best practice for sustainable soils in the south coast of Western Australia

The Torbay Catchment Southern Soils component will facilitate demonstration field trials in targeted locations in the Torbay Catchment area in key soil health areas of soil biology and nutrient matching. Associated workshops, field days, forums and communication activities will engage farming communities in innovative practices to increase skills and knowledge and adopt new behaviours. The project will commence with an intensive “soil food web” workshop to engage the local farming community. Subsequent to this, the project will establish demonstration sites to test a range of commercially beneficial soil microbes and assess their ability to increase organic soil carbon, water holding capacity and increase nutrient availability in soil where pasture is grown. details and on-going results can be found on the soil microbes page. Funded by South Coast Natural Resource Management.